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Grand Itasca Receives Acute Stroke Ready Hospital Designation

7/7/2014
Grand Rapids, MN – Grand Itasca Clinic & Hospital was recently designated as an Acute Stroke Ready Hospital by the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH). The Acute Stroke Ready Hospital designation means Grand Itasca operates best practices to stabilize stroke patients and administer life-saving medications. This designation is a result of 2013 Minnesota legislation allowing for stroke-ready recognition at the state level for smaller, rural hospitals. The importance to smaller, rural hospitals, such as Grand Itasca, is that it allows them to promote their stroke readiness to their communities. “We want our patients to know that Grand Itasca’s Stroke Care Team is trained and prepared to treat acute stroke symptoms. Our Stroke Care Team - made up of Emergency Department nurses and doctors, as well as staff from lab, radiology and pharmacy - collaborates with local emergency medical services to provide the best care possible to these patients,” says Stroke Program Coordinator Pauline Landgren, RN. According to MDH Commissioner of Health, Dr. Ed Ehlinger, “Nearly one in three Minnesota stroke victims first receive care at a small, rural hospital. In addition, more than one-third of Minnesotans live more than 60 minutes away from a Primary Stroke Center.” These facts highlight the importance of smaller hospitals becoming stroke-ready designated. 
 

Grand Rapids, MN – Grand Itasca Clinic & Hospital was recently designated as an Acute Stroke Ready Hospital by the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH). The Acute Stroke Ready Hospital designation means Grand Itasca operates best practices to stabilize stroke patients and administer life-saving medications. This designation is a result of 2013 Minnesota legislation allowing for stroke-ready recognition at the state level for smaller, rural hospitals. The importance to smaller, rural hospitals, such as Grand Itasca, is that it allows them to promote their stroke readiness to their communities. “We want our patients to know that Grand Itasca’s Stroke Care Team is trained and prepared to treat acute stroke symptoms. Our Stroke Care Team - made up of Emergency Department nurses and doctors, as well as staff from lab, radiology and pharmacy - collaborates with local emergency medical services to provide the best care possible to these patients,” says Stroke Program Coordinator Pauline Landgren, RN. According to MDH Commissioner of Health, Dr. Ed Ehlinger, “Nearly one in three Minnesota stroke victims first receive care at a small, rural hospital. In addition, more than one-third of Minnesotans live more than 60 minutes away from a Primary Stroke Center.” These facts highlight the importance of smaller hospitals becoming stroke-ready designated.

Grand Itasca treats an average of 60 stroke patients each year. In addition to always having a Stroke Care team available, Grand Itasca also has a CT scanner onsite and can administer a key clot-dissolving drug called tPA. Grand Itasca’s Stroke Program Medical Director Paul Palacek, MD says, “It has been a privilege to watch the Grand Itasca team come together to provide this critical service to our community.”

Time is brain tissue with stroke patients. Remember FAST to recognize signs and symptoms of a stroke:

Face – look for uneven smile

Arm – check if one arm is weak

Speech – listen for slurred speech

Time – call 911 right away if exhibiting any of these symptoms

About Grand Itasca Clinic & Hospital

Grand Itasca Clinic & Hospital is a non-profit, 50-bed integrated hospital and clinic that employs over 600 people, including over 60 providers providing primary care such as Pediatrics, Obstetrics/Gynecology, Internal Medicine and Family Medicine to specialty care such as Oncology and Urology.

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