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Pediatric Emergency Training Comes To Grand Itasca

5/17/2013

Grand Rapids, MN - Trauma cases involving children are rare but results are more commonly tragic. According to the Minnesota State Ambulance Reporting (MNSTAR), less than 6 percent of all ambulance runs statewide in 2009 involved pediatric patients. Particularly in rural areas, where low population density usually means fewer EMS calls, providers see even fewer pediatric cases. It is especially difficult for emergency responders in rural areas to retain the necessary knowledge when practiced so infrequently. 

 
Trauma cases involving children are rare but results are more commonly tragic. According to the Minnesota State Ambulance Reporting (MNSTAR), less than 6 percent of all ambulance runs statewide in 2009 involved pediatric patients. Particularly in rural areas, where low population density usually means fewer EMS calls, providers see even fewer pediatric cases. It is especially difficult for emergency responders in rural areas to retain the necessary knowledge when practiced so infrequently. 
 
To address the knowledge and confidence gap for pediatric cases, Emergency Medical Services for Children Resource Center (EMSRC) applied for and received a grant to bring simulation training to rural areas. Grand Itasca Clinic & Hospital was selected as a host site for the pediatric trauma simulation training, which was held on April 25th. “We appreciated the opportunity to host the ‘hands-on’ Pediatric Simulation Training. It allowed for both Emergency Medical Services and Hospital Staff to practice providing pediatric trauma care as a team” says Pauline Landgren RN, Trauma Program Coordinator at Grand Itasca. 
 
Several Grand Itasca staff attended the hands-on training, including Molly Lenoch, a Registered Nurse in the Emergency Department and Intensive Care Unit. Molly said she “was fortunate enough to attend this training and found it very beneficial and fun.” She and the other training attendees practiced various trauma situations, including establishing airways, inserting IVs, placing backboards and needle decompression. Molly also explained that “pediatric trauma is extra stressful and it’s good to practice, practice, practice whenever possible so you can feel knowledgeable when that emergency happens.”
 
For more information about this training and others like it, please contact Pauline Landgren RN, Trauma Program Coordinator at 218-999 -1272.

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